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Correspondent Letters Between General Forrest and General Washburn Over The Battle of Fort Pillow

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The Religion Of Abraham Lincoln By Robert N. Reeves

The Religion Of Abraham Lincoln By Robert N. Reeves

Source: H. L. Green, The Free Thought Magazine, Volume 19, 1901, January to December (Chicago: 1901), 455-462.

livinginthelandofcotton.com
SOME years ago Colonel Robert G. Ingersoll engaged in a controversy with General Charles H. T. Collis over the religion of Abraham Lincoln. Colonel Ingersoll contributed but two short letters to the discussion, as it soon became apparent to him that General Collis knew little or nothing of the real life of Lincoln. These two letters, however, together with the letters of General Collis, have recently been published by the latter in a little pamphlet entitled, "The Religion of Abraham Lincoln," in which is included also a letter from General Daniel E. Sickles and one from the Hon. Oliver S. Munsell, both of whom, like General Collis, attempt to prove that Abraham Lincoln was a Christian.
I have read carefully these letters of General Collis and his friends, and, beyond finding that Lincoln had…

Abraham Lincoln and South Carolina by J. Wagner Jermon

Abraham Lincoln and South Carolina by J. Wagner Jermon
The period has now arrived when it behooves every honest man and American citizen to examine carefully and thoughtfully the present condition of our distracted country. The black cloud of Disunion now hangs like a pall, above us, and threatens with annihilation our whole social, moral, and political horizon. For eighty-four years our noble republic has lived amidst the storms and tempests that have shaken Europe to its centre, exhibiting to the admiring gaze of the whole world, an unexampled instance of prosperity. The question now is, shall this glorious fabric of our Union, erected by those staunch patriots whose names our infant tongues were learned to lisp, be ruthlessly torn asunder, state by state, until the falling timbers become the prey of the traitors false alike to their country and their God? Or, shall we come to the rescue, in our patriot strength, hand in hand, and stand firm upon our constitution, determined that we w…

A Southern Song: Address To Her Maryland Lover, By A Virginia Girl.

A Southern Song Address To Her Maryland Lover,  By A Virginia Girl.
Air — "Fly to the Desert." Fly to the South, come fly with me! In Richmond there's a home for thee, But oh; the choice, what heart can fear Submission at home, or Freedom here.
If wounded, thy true love will be A Florence Nightingale to thee, If killed, above thee she will pour, Of pearly tears, full many a shower.
Then fly with me, if thou dost claim, Thy Southern rights and Southern name; And foremost 'mid our ranks show forth Thy hatred of the oppressing North.
But if like some in deep contrition. You hope for Maryland's submission, And like a dastard calmly kneel, And bow to the ursurper's steel.
Then fare thee well, I'd never own My looks were on a coward thrown. Love to a poltroon I'd ne'er give, But rather bid him die, than live!
M. F. Q.

New Englander, Now a Confederate Soldier, An Appeal To the Federal Soldiers

AN APPEAL TO THE FEDERAL SOLDIERS. by New Englander, Now a Confederate Soldier Published 1863
https://archive.org/details/appealtofederals00newe

SOLDIERS: Two years of our sanguinary conflict have passed; hundreds of thousands of brave men have fallen; hearts have been made to mourn, homes have been desolated, and the voice of sorrow and sadness is heard throughout your land and ours. We both desire peace. Let us, therefore, for a moment lay aside the weapons of strife, and reason together on the lessons this conflict is adapted to teach. We of the South have seceded from a Union we had once loved, and have unfurled to the world the emblem of a new nationality. It was because sectional prejudice and ill-will in the North had raised into the Chair of State a man whose political principles led him to wage a continual war against our interests and constitutional rights. Slavery was the apparent, though not the real cause of war. That real cause lay in the diversity of our interests. You were …