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From... Oratory of the South: From the Civil War to the Present Time by Edwin Dubois Shurter

From... Oratory of the South: From the Civil War to the Present Time 
by
Edwin Dubois Shurter




Chapter: The Women of the Confederacy by Charles Scott
Of the Rosedale (Miss.) Bar
[Extract from an address delivered on "Confederate Day'' at the [Mississippi Chautauqua, Crystal Springs, Miss., July 30, 1906.] 

Yet a little while and the last of the thin gray line will cross over the river to rest beneath the shade of the trees. These heroes of the lost cause should be and will be remembered and revered throughout all the recurring years. Here, as in all acts of grace and kindliness, where the heart speaks best and surest, it has been the province of the fair daughters of the South to point the way. And so Decoration Day comes to us as a direct inspiration from their pure hearts, and if the truth were known I dare say that some noble Southern woman first suggested "Confederate Day" for this Chautauqua. And so it is with the stately monuments to the Confederate dead found in a…

The Confederate Dead by Benjamin Franklin Jonas

From... Oratory of the South: From the Civil War to the Present Time 
by
Edwin Dubois Shurter

Chapter: The Confederate Dead  by  Benjamin Franklin Jonas 

Formerly United States Senator from Louisiana 
[Extracts from an address at the laying of the corner stone of a monument to the memory of the Confederate dead, at Baton Rouge, La., February 22, 1886.] 
The scars left by civil war soon heal and fade away, as does the memory of the privations and sufferings which it entailed. The angry controversies which precede and the bitterness which follows pass away with the generation whose quarrels necessitated the stern arbitrament of war. New generations of people of the same blood come together as companions in the same walks of life, and join together in the same aims, aspirations, and ambitions, forgetful or regardless of the quarrel which divided their fathers, the causes for which have passed into history. 
In our own country the time has arrived when the hateful memories of the war can no longer…

From... Echoes From the Battlefield or, Southern Life During the War by Noble C. Williams

From... Echoes From the Battlefield or, Southern Life During the War by  Noble C. Williams
CHAPTER V. 
Soon after this, first one, and then another of the Southern States seceded, until at last his own State joined the alliance, all of which was displeasing to him. These States soon formed a compact known as the Confederate States of America. No sooner had this been accomplished than the bombardment of Fort Sumter took place, which ushered into existence one of the most terrible and destructive wars ever known to history, a war in which brother fought against brother, and father was arrayed against son, and continued for nearly four long years; nor did it cease until it had left the South truly desolate. The shrill blast of the bugle, as it called for men good and true as volunteers to sustain its newly created government, did not fail, as it sounded, to penetrate the peaceful home of Doctor C., where it stirred up the warlike spirit of his two young sons, Edward Livingston and Pickens No…

Our War, Our Cause, and Our Duty: Addressed to the Confederate Soldiers Charleston, S. C. (1861) By Charles Wesley Andrews

Our War, Our Cause, and Our Duty: Addressed to the Confederate Soldiers Charleston, S. C. (1861) By Charles Wesley Andrews

Soldiers: 
You find yourselves suddenly plunged into all the  realities of a hard service, away from home, at the hazard  of property, health and life. Why are you where you are? Unlike the armies of Europe — the unconsulted, uninquiring subjects of mere power — you do not fight like machines simply because you are bidden. Never  was there such an army so entirely one in heart and  mind with the authorities in command, civil and military. Their counsels are your counsels, and their objects are your objects, one undivided. Never were there such immense armies in the field who so longed for peace and homeland who were so resolved to see neither until the work which they had undertaken should be accomplished. 
But this is not enough. You, as well as the authorities in command, are amenable to truth and justice, and to the judgments of an eternal world. Therefore, when any …

Escape of General Breckinridge, Chapter 7 by John Taylor Wood

Escape of General Breckinridge, Chapter 7 by  John Taylor Wood
About John Taylor Wood
Born at Fort Snelling, Iowa Territory, August 13, 1830 Grandson of President Zachary Taylor Nephew of Jefferson Davis Graduated from the U. S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland Commissioned Lieutenant in the Confederate Navy, October 4, 1861 April 1862 was assigned to the CSS Virginia Chapter 7 (from Famous Adventures and Prison Escapes of the Civil War, pp. 298-238.)
AS one of the aides of President Jefferson Davis, I left Richmond with him and his cabinet on April 2, 1865, the night of evacuation, and accompanied him through Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georgia, until his capture. Except Lieutenant Barnwell, I was the only- one of the party who escaped. After our surprise, I was guarded by a trooper, a German, who had appropriated my horse and most of my belongings. I determined, if possible, to escape; but after witnessing Mr. Davis's unsuccessful attempt, I was doubtful of success. However, I consulted …